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Jim.

5 Speed manual transmission output shaft bearing spacers.

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I have a 1993 Toyota Camry, 5SFE engine with a 5 speed manual transmission.

The left side drive shaft had excessive play in the transmission(vertically and sideways) and the oil seal in the transmission case was leaking, no doubt due to the slop. As a result, a mechanic/engine rebuilder friend of mine took the bearing retainer away to his place of work and machined .1 mm off the face of it. This has reduced the sideways play greatly; but there is still some there. From my previous experience with another Camry of the same vintage, it also had a fair amount of slop, but was not manfiesting any noticeable problems.

There is a spacer ring between the bearing retainer and the outside cone of the transmission roller taper bearing. I am wondering if Toyota supply spacers of different sizes? The one in the transmission now is 2.5 mm. Is there a set of sizes I wonder. It seems to me that it would be good practice to pre-load this tapered roller bearing slightly. 

I figured I would ask here before driving into town to ask the dealers.

If anyone can clarify this please post here.

Thanks,

Jim.

Edited by Jim.

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Are you referring to the diff preload shims? 

If so, shims were available from 1.90mm to 2.80mm in 0.05mm increments. They may no longer be available.

Preload should be 0.8 to 1.6 Nm. Each shim will change preload approximately 0.3 to 0.4 Nm.

These preload figures are with an empty transmission housing except for the diff and with the transmission case bolts torqued to 29Nm.

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21 hours ago, trentmeyer23 said:

Are you referring to the diff preload shims? [/Quote]

Yes.

If so, shims were available from 1.90mm to 2.80mm in 0.05mm increments. They may no longer be available.

That's good. I will check with Toyota when I am next in town.

Preload should be 0.8 to 1.6 Nm. Each shim will change preload approximately 0.3 to 0.4 Nm.

Ok. I think I have understood that. Does that mean that smaller shims are fitted until no free play is felt, then removed and smaller ones fitted according to your figures above? ie: to provide the .3 to .4 Nm?

These preload figures are with an empty transmission housing except for the diff and with the transmission case bolts torqued to 29Nm.

This has me puzzled though. Can you explain further please?

Thanks for the reply Trent.

Jim.

 

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Thicker shims will increase the preload.

Thinner shims will decrease it.

The preload is checked using a very small flex beam(not click type) or dial style torque wrench.

In order to test the diff preload, you do not want the input or output(more so) shaft in the transmission; as they create extra drag and make the preload inaccurate.

The same test procedure applies to the output shaft preload settings.

I made a tool for doing the diff preload, by parting off a spare CV stub that I had for the V6 gearbox I was rebuilding; and welding a nut in. I then thread locked the bolt in place.

20160114_221052.jpg.

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13 hours ago, trentmeyer23 said:
Quote

Thicker shims will increase the preload.

Thinner shims will decrease it. [/Quote]

Of course. I had it the wrong way around in my mind at first, thanks for the clarification.

Quote

The preload is checked using a very small flex beam(not click type) or dial style torque wrench.

Ok. So when the tapered roller is pre-loaded correctly, the torque required to rotate the dummy stub will be as above? ie: .8 to 1.6 nm?

What is "a very small flex beam" please?

Quote

In order to test the diff preload, you do not want the input or output(more so) shaft in the transmission; as they create extra drag and make the preload inaccurate.

   Got it!

Quote

The same test procedure applies to the output shaft preload settings.

This has confused me though, sorry. Surely the output shaft torque required to rotate it will be the same as the test stub? What have I missed here?

Quote

I made a tool for doing the diff preload, by parting off a spare CV stub that I had for the V6 gearbox I was rebuilding; and welding a nut in. I then thread locked the bolt in place.

I could make one of those easily enough. I have a spare drive shaft I can take a stub from.

Thanks again Trent! It's almost clear to me now.

20160114_221052.jpgI made a tool for doing the diff preload, by parting off a spare CV stub that I had for the V6 gearbox I was rebuilding; and welding a nut in. I then thread locked the bolt in place..

 

Edited by Jim.

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The output shaft is tested the same way as the video, except it is turned via the the nut. The diff and input shaft should not be installed when testing the output shaft.

This video will assist quite well. Different transmission; however, very similar in design.

It also shows the torque wrench style.

https://youtube/EOJmUhQ5ThA

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Thanks again Trent.

I understand the principle now. I found that the shims are no longer listed as available from Toyota.

I will probably be able to either cut some or machine some. Although, machining something 2.8 mm thick presents some challenges. As for cutting some thin ones to add to the existing 2.5 mm ones? Well, I don't know. Any thoughts about this?

I have to replace the rear main oil seal in this Camry one day soon. The front seals have now been done, so that is all the remains to be replaced. So, when I do that, I will tackle this differential pre-load problem then. In the meantime, I can figure out wether to machine some shims or cut some.

One remaining question. I have only worked on one side. It stands to reason that the other side will at least need checking too. Does that make sense?

Jim.

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The drivers side bearing cup is fixed. The passenger side bearing cup has the preload shims.

I used these guys for some shims I needed. Located in Melbourne. Ordered Monday morning, delivered in Brisbane on Tuesday afternoon.

http://www.precisionshims.com.au/

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Very good!

Thanks for the link. I will remove the shim again and measure inside and outside diameters.

Unless there is another way to find out?

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2 hours ago, Jim. said:

Very good!

Thanks for the link. I will remove the shim again and measure inside and outside diameters.

Unless there is another way to find out?

Not really, there is minimal information out there. 

From memory, the thicker shims were around $10 each plus postage. I was lucky that they had some very thin ones on the shelf that I needed, they were around half the price.

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Thanks Trent.

I have to replace the rear main seal sometime soon. When I do that, I will of course be draining the gearbox oil and removing the drive shafts. I will measure the ID and OD of the shims and make an assessment of what thickness shim I will need.

I will leave this thread open until I do that. Or should I mark it as solved now?

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I'm not sure if you are following.

The entire gearbox needs to be disassembled in order to access the shims. See below.

20160608_183006.thumb.jpg.4a43bd2a434200c02265c11eb5ac02af.jpg

This thread will remain open as I will not be closing it.

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22 hours ago, trentmeyer23 said:

I'm not sure if you are following.

 

I appears that I am not. Or at least, we are on different tracks. I will ask my mechanic/engine rebuilder buddy to read this thread when he call in next. He did the small mod that I described above and knows what shim I am talking in my opening post.

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8 hours ago, Jim. said:

I appears that I am not. Or at least, we are on different tracks. I will ask my mechanic/engine rebuilder buddy to read this thread when he call in next. He did the small mod that I described above and knows what shim I am talking in my opening post.

In that case, I have no idea welhere he is putting this "shim".

The gearbox is only supposed to have 2 adjustable shims. The output shaft bearing and the diff preload shim. Both require dismantling of the gearbear to adjust.

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