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stormwardenx

Something weird with my handbrake

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go under the car get a shifter and a spanner then start tighting in the bolt for the handbrake recommend do this under safe condition and also know what you are doing.

Otherwise pull abit harder on the handbrake and it should be fine

Hope that help you

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On a few recent occasions I've been using my handbrake for some fun around corners...would that have done it?

It had been doing this before I started doing that though :\

Oh, and its a 2003 camry ateva.

Edited by stormwardenx

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Yeah...for some reason, when I park my camry, it rolls back slightly after I let off the foot brake...

Anyone know why?

Most cars will do this, it's because the handbrake only operates the rear wheel brakes whilst the normal foot brake operates both front and rear (with a bias to the front). So if you park on a hill (even a slight one), the reduction in braking ability will cause the car to rock back onto the rear wheels, with appropriate weight transfer as well.

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Happens to my 2005 Camry ever since day one. I've now learned to release the foot brake very slowly which seemed to "fix" the issue ;)

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Happens on our Camry & Corolla so I jacked them up and found that with the handbrake on you can still rock the rear wheels backward and forward. The handbrake on cars with rear disc ion brakes does not use the calipers but a drum system on the inside of the rotor, much like any drum brake assembly...It has no effect at all on the normal braking operation of the car..

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Happens on our Camry & Corolla so I jacked them up and found that with the handbrake on you can still rock the rear wheels backward and forward. The handbrake on cars with rear disc ion brakes does not use the calipers but a drum system on the inside of the rotor, much like any drum brake assembly...It has no effect at all on the normal braking operation of the car..

Not all cars with rear discs have a drum for the handbrake, I know for a fact that my '97 AE102 (pretty sure most other Corollas use this too) has a threaded rod which acts on the back of the piston to allow the handbrake to actuate the caliper. Self-adjusting too.

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Happens to my 2005 Camry ever since day one. I've now learned to release the foot brake very slowly which seemed to "fix" the issue ;)

Yeah ditto that, my camry does that too :)

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Just checked my repair manual for Corollas(1997-2006) and it shows a drum brake for the parking brake(disc brake models)...Maybe some are different...???

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Just checked my repair manual for Corollas(1997-2006) and it shows a drum brake for the parking brake(disc brake models)...Maybe some are different...???

You sure it's not just showing the normal brake drum on the same page? Base model AE112s still had drums at the rear. Considering the number of similarities between the AE102 and AE112, especially in the driveline, I would be surprised if they changed to a separate drum for the parking brake on disc-brake models. Especially since the rear discs are the same on the 112 as they are on the 102.

By the way, 1997-2006 covers several models, in Australia the AE102, AE112, ZZE122 and ZZE123 models all fit into that time period. Let me guess, you bought the CD off eBay?

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Yes I have the CD copy but no I also have a Haynes manual which covers Australian models, with righthand dive evenand including all the models you listed.

Just to satisfy byou I have just removed a rear wheel to physically prove what I already knew, the parking brake is a drum assembly built into the rotor assembly . . It also shows the use of drum brakes on some models without 4 wheel disc brakes.

On a historical note, one of the reasons they use this configuration on cars with rear discs is that sufficient pressure cannot be mechanically applied thru the pistons which will effectively hold the car stationary, and was a big problem in the early days of 4 wheel disc brakes and probaly still is.. It is not a seperate assembly. It is a parking brake only and is not used for normal stopping, only the dics are..

Something you can try which will show the mechanical effort required to stop and hold a car with disc brakes is the get yourself on a hill (wtih no traffic around) turn off the motor, operate the pedals a couple of times let the car roll and see how much pedal pressure is required just to stop the car without power assistance...

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Yes I have the CD copy but no I also have a Haynes manual which covers Australian models, with righthand dive evenand including all the models you listed.

Just to satisfy byou I have just removed a rear wheel to physically prove what I already knew, the parking brake is a drum assembly built into the rotor assembly . . It also shows the use of drum brakes on some models without 4 wheel disc brakes.

On a historical note, one of the reasons they use this configuration on cars with rear discs is that sufficient pressure cannot be mechanically applied thru the pistons which will effectively hold the car stationary, and was a big problem in the early days of 4 wheel disc brakes and probaly still is.. It is not a seperate assembly. It is a parking brake only and is not used for normal stopping, only the dics are..

Something you can try which will show the mechanical effort required to stop and hold a car with disc brakes is the get yourself on a hill (wtih no traffic around) turn off the motor, operate the pedals a couple of times let the car roll and see how much pedal pressure is required just to stop the car without power assistance...

What does the CD say for a 1997 AE102 Corolla then? I have the Gregorys sitting right in front of me and it clearly shows the handbrake mechanism actuating on the rear of the brake piston for disc models. Having a CD that covers over a decade of a model which is usually replaced every 4 years is a bad idea, as it usually won't go into specific detail about particular models. Good idea having another manual there too, although I've noted that the Haynes sometimes covers several models too, or different years. This is because Haynes isn't an Australian company, and thus doesn't necessarily reflect the same product as we got here in Australia (different trim levels etc).

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The CD data I have only covers the 2004 model which has sufficient data to carry out any work I need to do on mine, even if it is a 2005 there ain't that much difference.

I don't think gregory's do a lot the manuals anymore. when I searched for a Gregorys manual for mine it kept coming up as Haynes. Another takeover perhaps.

I will say this, whatever you say you are looking I have to accept but I have never seen such a configuration. Also we have gotten way off track from the original question re a problem with a Camry and I think the question has been asked and answered. The problem is not a problem.

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On 8/17/2019 at 3:52 PM, spider21 said:

my 2004 camry park brake is a single 360` shoe, how do you replace it.

ive changed mine once.. thats part is correct.. cant remember as ive done it a long time ago.. but i think there are clips/bolts that are holding them, to access it, you have to take off the rear rotor as the handbrake shoe is located inside there

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