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oil in the intake manifold


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Yeh both my engines have done it seems normal at high revin motor.. Never thought of cleaning it out just usually only clean tb. Good question !

Isn't it 2 piece? Pull top piece out

Edited by 123R-Prozak
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I pulled my intake manifold off the weekend of 2 weekends ago and it was slightly difficult task especially if you just want to clean the oil out of it. I too did find some old in there but seeing as i was putting another intake manifold which i had polished up and changed across i had cleaned it before putting it back on. I think that only way to clean the oil up would be to maybe pull the throttle body off and see if you can fit your hand in there to clean it up... other than that pullint the manifold off would be the only way

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i saw it in there the last time i cleaned the TB and ICV and my hands are too fat lol. if u changed it over and then wanna keep it clean, get a oil catch can. however i heard that there is a reason why it needs to have oil there. the PCV valve lets some oil vapour recirculate into the intake manifold so that some oil goes into the combustion chamber to give the pistons some lubrication? but it seems not all the oil over time has been recirculated... so having an oil catch can would be a bad thing?

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It's Pcv / positive crankcase ventilation I believe.. When there is excessive pressure in the crankcase (pressure gone past the rings down the bottom) then it pressurizes so it needs to go somewhere, so your seals don't blow, so back through the Intake to reburn..

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oil vapour in the intake charge is a bad thing, increases the likelyhood of detonation.

The only real way to clean the oil out is to remove the plenum, which is a bit of a pain but not too bad. It's best to use new gaskets when re-installing the plenum and throttle body.

A well designed catch can will stop any oil vapour getting into the plenum, a cheap ebay can wont help as much as 90% of the cheap ones aren't chambered to separate the oil vapour from the air.

An example of a good one can be found here: https://radiumauto.com/index.php?p=product&id=37&parent=2

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haha. jason, that one looks very nice but hella expensive! :( would something like a greddy one suffice? i will have to remove the plenum one day i probably have to give me a day to do it. any recommend porting and polishing the intake manifold while its off?

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The best way would be to just shove in a lint free cloth on a coat hanger and mop up the excess oil, and then run a catch can from ur PCV to ur intake manifold. Learned from an bad experience.

I had to suck out 600ml of water out of the intake manifold after a flash flood in western sydney in april. was driving through a puddle and my car died. didnt turn it back on as I was hoping that my MAF had detected water. I looked into the manifold and it was swimming... I just took off my intake pipe, and shoved in a cloth on a coat hanger and had to mop and wring the water out of my intake manifold for about 20minutes. got about 600ml out of it, then just took out my spark plugs and disconnected my fuel line and cranked my engine for 5 seconds until the water mist was blown out of the cylinders. Drove the car for 30minutes and then changed my oil. Was good after.

I hear porting and polishing the intake manifold is good for a few hp gains but maybe also consider porting the throttle while your at it, put in one of those cosworth thermal gaskets to keep your plenum temps down.

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The best way would be to just shove in a lint free cloth on a coat hanger and mop up the excess oil, and then run a catch can from ur PCV to ur intake manifold. Learned from an bad experience.

I had to suck out 600ml of water out of the intake manifold after a flash flood in western sydney in april. was driving through a puddle and my car died. didnt turn it back on as I was hoping that my MAF had detected water. I looked into the manifold and it was swimming... I just took off my intake pipe, and shoved in a cloth on a coat hanger and had to mop and wring the water out of my intake manifold for about 20minutes. got about 600ml out of it, then just took out my spark plugs and disconnected my fuel line and cranked my engine for 5 seconds until the water mist was blown out of the cylinders. Drove the car for 30minutes and then changed my oil. Was good after.

I hear porting and polishing the intake manifold is good for a few hp gains but maybe also consider porting the throttle while your at it, put in one of those cosworth thermal gaskets to keep your plenum temps down.

^^ This man knows. do this.

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ok, just finished pulling the plenum apart yesterday with filit. Thanks to him, alot of things were easier. Guide will be put up soon. :) for now the plenum is clean as a whistle ;) now have to get a catch can that suits.

one question though. with the 2zzge there seems to be 2 pcv valves on it: one goes to the plenum and one goes to the throttle body. when connecting the catch can there will be only one inlet and one outlet. which of the 2 hoses connects to the catch can? also would we have to then block one of the hoses?

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but last night i found that both lines have oil inside... i was reading on the celica.org forum and they said to connect with a Y connector into the inlet of the catch can. then block off the throttle body and connect the outlet back into the plenum.

with the link that CH45E that he posted above, there are 2 (dual) catch cans there, i'm guessing this would be the correct one as it stops any vapour getting into the plenum. therefore i was thinking to get the 15mm catch can instead of the 9mm one to acommodate for both of the hoses. then connect those again to the corresponding throttle and plenum. 430 is quite a bit of coin to spend... :(

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The reason why you have oil in the breather line is that the PCV system only works properly on part-throttle (ie vacuum conditions). On full throttle (ie no vacuum) the PCV won't open and any cam-cover pressure will force the vapour up the breather line instead.

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