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Front Rotors/pads


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Good that you are organised and will only have to look in one place.

Not going to say how many places and storage containers I have to search. Still looking for those M6 bolts for the transmission pan.

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8 hours ago, campbeam said:

Good that you are organised and will only have to look in one place.

Not going to say how many places and storage containers I have to search. Still looking for those M6 bolts for the transmission pan.

When one has so much differing stuff, you have to try and keep some order. My garage is by no means organised. It's a little messy at the moment, but I have started to reorganise and categorise the different things. I also have storage containers, those tactix storage bins I use to store N.O.S. motorcycle parts (keeps them from degrading if placed on a shelf) and my detailing products (need to keep these clean and dust free).

 They are very strong and well made and will last a life time. Those cheaper clear plastic ones are ok, but you have to be careful not to drop one because they will shatter. The Tactix ones will never break. You can also get a cheap label maker and label all your bins so you have an idea where to start looking.

https://www.bunnings.com.au/tactix-30l-heavy-duty-storage-box_p2583689
https://www.bunnings.com.au/tactix-45l-heavy-duty-storage-box_p2583690
https://www.bunnings.com.au/tactix-60l-heavy-duty-storage-box_p2583691

 

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1 hour ago, Tony Prodigy said:

I have started to reorganise and categorise the different things.

Yes I have been gradually reorganising myself. Certainly refreshing the memory about how much oil I gave on hand. I recently bought 6 of the "attractively priced" storage boxes from SCA when on special. 

1 hour ago, Tony Prodigy said:

They are very strong and well made and will last a life time. Those cheaper clear plastic ones are ok, but you have to be careful not to drop one because they will shatter. The Tactix ones will never break.

I should start buying ones that will last a lifetime. 

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My front brake pads arrived today. I ordered two sets for the front and as you all know a single set for the rear. I don't have to worry about brakes or oil for a while now... I can concentrate more on detailing work :biggrin:

 

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I came across this little device that tests brake fluid and thought, what the hey..

It measures the amount of moisture apparently. I haven't had a chance to try it out as yet, but I'll let you all know soon.

Anyone else have gadgets like these ?

 

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15 hours ago, Tony Prodigy said:

I came across this little device that tests brake fluid and thought, what the hey..

It measures the amount of moisture apparently. I haven't had a chance to try it out as yet, but I'll let you all know soon.

Anyone else have gadgets like these ?

 

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Now that looks like a handy item to have. Interested to see your post when you do use it.

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I had a crack at this test this morning. I was hoping to do my D-Max (still has a Factory Fill) also but it's reservoir is shaped such that when the fluid drops a bit it doesn't provide the access to probe into the lower portion of the reservoir where the fluid resides..  So off to the Aurion. The initial indication is very good seeing I only recently flushed the fluid so I was expecting a good result. The tester indicated less that 1%. I don't think it's possible for brake fluid, even a brand new sealed one, to have absolutely zero % moisture content. Would this be a fair assumption ?

So to further add a little more scrutiny to the tester I still had the glass jar I had used to collect the old fluid from my recent flush and test this. Funny enough, it too came back the same result.

So I thought to add a tiny amount of water, swill it around and then re test. The tester indicated "Danger". So it does seem to work.

Conclusion. Although this test is not even remotely scientific, even old fluid can still be ok perhaps, although not ideal, one should not panic in a hurry if they are overdue for a fluid flush. I think sticking to the "every two years" regime would be fine. I'm even more happy to do it annually.

First two pics is my Aurion and the second two of the Raguletto Jar is water added to brake fluid

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5 hours ago, Tony Prodigy said:

I don't think it's possible for brake fluid, even a brand new sealed one, to have absolutely zero % moisture content. Would this be a fair assumption ?

Just guessing that a tester with a flexible lead will suit those vehicles with harder to access reservoirs.

https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/DY23-DY23B-Handheld-Car-Brake-Fluid-Oil-Tester-Pen-Fuel-Automotive-Detector-HOT/293548462036?hash=item4458da0fd4:g:qpUAAOSw6N9ek71W

I was recently reading up on brake fluid and there was a brand used in motor racing that has zero air content due to their manufacturing process. Probably only way to achieve a zero % moisture content would be to have a very low humidity environment in the manufacturing environment. Presumably better to have fully sealed bottles so the brake fluid cannot easily absorb moisture before the bottle is opened. Probably a bit over the top, I store my brake fluid bottles either lying down or upside down. 

Anyway your testing proved that this tool can produce the necessary results. It should be quite handy for testing the brake fluid before using it especially if it has not been recently purchased.

 

 

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  • 2 months later...

Greetings gents...

Just a quick word about my recent front rotor and pad replacement. Been a couple of months now since I had my local mechanic replace my Presara's front rotors and pads. DBA rotors and Bendix ultimate pads, Penrite dot 3 brake fluid.

Brakes are brilliant. Pedal feel is very firm. Down side is that these pads cause a lot of dust on the rims. Washing them weekly Atm.

I'll replace the rear rotors and pads on my return to QLD. 

Cheers

Mike62

Edited by Bigmike62
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6 hours ago, Bigmike62 said:

Down side is that these pads cause a lot of dust on the rims.

Nice one Big Mike. There's nothing better than a refreshed brake system.

Regarding the dust, I have the same problem at present with the bendix pads, which is why I have the Remsa pads ready to go when my Bendix are ready for replacement.

The beauty of the Remsa pads is that they don't produce much dust at all and perform as good if not better than the Bendix.

 

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You got me curious about that moisture content meter. Thought I was going to fall down a rabbit hole, but thankfully it's more of a pothole, quite interesting to learn!
https://media.supercheapauto.com.au/sca/images/articles/Repl_Brake_Fluid.pdf
and http://www.mechanexpert.com/a-full-best-practise-guide-to-brake-fluid-testing/

Though a little part of me feels like I've robbed myself from buying another tool to add to the collection 😛

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Yes that SuperCheapAuto article was interesting. The voltage reading of the brake fluid explains how the brake fluid testers work.

Recent learning for me was to lubricate the brake caliper sliding pins using anti-seize copper grease. Something that I had not done in the past when changing brake pads. Now that I know, it is on the maintenance list.

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6 minutes ago, campbeam said:

Recent learning for me was to lubricate the brake caliper sliding pins using anti-seize copper grease

Yes Ashley, very important and something that can be done relatively quickly while you have it apart.

I applied the bendix grease if you recall a while back when I did my fronts. That reminds me, I have to inspect my front pads again soon as they are getting close to the end.

FYI

https://www.bendix.com.au/bendix-news/bendix-ceramasil-brake-parts-lubricant-0

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  • 7 months later...

Mechanic said the rear brakes needed sorting: $350. Do that myself I thought.

RDC discs and pads ~ $200 delivered, a bottle of dot4 and off with the left rear. Pads are a whisker over 50% worn, discs have barely a lip either side. No shudder on braking, braking feels good. Whilst there I bled that brake circuit. Fluid read 0.50! 😲 Now reads 0.29. 😀

All back together, new discs and pads into the Aurion shelf for when they're really due.

It's my sons car. He's a conservative driver. With 45% of the pad left how many kms before I should have another look d'ya think?

 

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9 hours ago, boxerboy said:

Mechanic said the rear brakes needed sorting: $350.

I love when they say things like that. They seem to think we're all wood ducks hahaha. Rear brakes take very little punishment compared to the fronts. Good call to leave them as they were because those pads, despite being 50% will probably last another 3 years. The rotors would probably never need replacing unless something major has occurred and I'd think not. 

Good job checking and bleeding. I'd concentrate more on the fronts to be honest. An annual check is all you need, and if your fussy, 6 monthly. Nothing will really go wrong in there if the sliders are lubed and the fluid is flushed regularly. 
If you Son is not heavy footed, the level of degradation is greatly reduced and good for him too . Depending on what brand you have, and being 45%, I'd estimate roughly 12 months or less to be on the safe side. You shouldn't wait until they have no meat left before changing them at the risk of scoring the disc. Change them when they have anywhere between 3mm or less thickness.

A DIY approach is always good to have and will save you plenty of money. Probably good to get your boy involved too. Great learning opportunity for both.

All the best mate :thumbsup:

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1 hour ago, Tony Prodigy said:

I love when they say things like that. They seem to think we're all wood ducks hahaha. Rear brakes take very little punishment compared to the fronts. Good call to leave them as they were because those pads, despite being 50% will probably last another 3 years. The rotors would probably never need replacing unless something major has occurred and I'd think not. 

Good job checking and bleeding. I'd concentrate more on the fronts to be honest. An annual check is all you need, and if your fussy, 6 monthly. Nothing will really go wrong in there if the sliders are lubed and the fluid is flushed regularly. 
If you Son is not heavy footed, the level of degradation is greatly reduced and good for him too . Depending on what brand you have, and being 45%, I'd estimate roughly 12 months or less to be on the safe side. You shouldn't wait until they have no meat left before changing them at the risk of scoring the disc. Change them when they have anywhere between 3mm or less thickness.

A DIY approach is always good to have and will save you plenty of money. Probably good to get your boy involved too. Great learning opportunity for both.

All the best mate :thumbsup:

Fully support what Tony has posted. I expect that it will be a few years or 30K kms before the pads really need to be changed. When the front brake pads and/or rotors need to be replaced, that will be a good time to consider also checking/replacing the rear rotors. 

Best thing for brake maintenance is to regularly change the brake fluid.

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  • 7 months later...

Last weekend, I checked the pads and rotors for wear and possible replacement. Previously I had thought about also about checking or replacing the brake fluid but got a bit hot and tired so left for another time. 

Good bit of timing that The Car Nut posted this YouTube video. After using my brake fluid tester, one yellow light indicated that the fluid was still OK.

 

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