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Best Oil viscosity for aurion


Chris H

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Hi

just wondering what’s the preferred oil grade for aurions.  I’ve had my aurion for close to 2 years and at both services (with toyota) they’ve used 15w40. Previous service history showed a 5w30 and also Valvoline gtx protection (not sure what grade that is). Car has done 125000 kms. Will continuing with 15w40 be okay or should I come back down to a 5w30 or 10w30? Anyone with good or bad experience with 15w40? Thanks. 

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I hate oil threads, but if I have to offer advice, I'd say stick with the 5w-30. Modern engines have pretty tight tolerances when cold and need a thinner viscosity for this "cold start up". I think 15w is too thick, especially if you live in a cold region.

I've been using the same 5w-30 oil since day one of my ownership and everything is running like clockwork. No funny ticking noises, smoke, rattles or unusual behaviour.

It's up to you, but  for me personally, I wouldn't use a 15w oil on a 2GR-FE

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I am guessing that you have already looked at the oil viscosity recommendations in your vehicle’s owner manual and probably also looked at various oil manufacturer’s Lube Guides.  

There is a slight difference in oil viscosity recommendations between the 40 series and the 50 series. Presumably there are engine manufacturing differences between the series with the 50 series potentially having tighter tolerances and lower oil viscosity range recommendations to support improved fuel economy.

Lower tolerances would explain why 15W-40 can potentially be used with the earlier 40 series Aurions. 

In general, I would suggest a preferred oil viscosity for the 2GR-FE engine as being either 5W-30 or 5W-40 as an initial starting point. You need to consider the outside temperature when you start the engine and driving conditions.

With my 2006 Aurion now with 220K on the odometer, I use a variety of oil viscosities. In winter I am more likely to now use 5W-30 and in Summer, use 5W-30, 5W-40 or 10W-40. Most of my driving is urban short distance so 5W-30 would be acceptable all year round. However, I do use a higher viscosity oil when I am on a road trip for better engine protection so 5W-40 and 10W-40 are my preferences. Over the past 5 years, I have also changed/progressed from Mineral based oils to semi-synthetic oils to synthetic oils. This also reflects how the oil specials have progressed to the current stage of a 5W-30 or 5W-40 full synthetic oil being regularly offered with a 40% discount.

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I have the same opinion as my compatriots on here, I have only ever used lower viscosity oils in my Aurion, usually it is 5w-30 full synthetic, I have used 10w 30 a few times over my years of ownership but mostly because i see specials and buy enough for the next oil change..so like Ash and Tony I would not use 15w oil even though the Aurion can handle it well..go for the best quality you can afford and these days they are often available on special buys and just keep them regular. I hope you found this repeat of other comments useful and keep asking any questions as someone will usually have the answer for you

Keep Safe

KAA

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9 minutes ago, ZZT86 said:

may mess with the operation of the VVT controller

Yes indeed. These modern tech engines are very highly strung and you really need to follow the manufacturers advice. They provide this for a reason so I'd rather not risk it with experimentation. Oil is pretty cheap these days, especially if you, like us, wait for the specials and go nuts and stock up. Then there would be no excuse to do 5k service intervals :biggrin:

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1 hour ago, ZZT86 said:

The 15 grade little heavy, may mess with the operation of the VVT controller.

 

1 hour ago, Tony Prodigy said:

These modern tech engines are very highly strung and you really need to follow the manufacturers advice. They provide this for a reason so I'd rather not risk it with experimentation.

Lets us just say that I definitely know that 20 grade WILL definitely mess with the operation of the VVTi controller on my 2006 Aurion. I was using 20W-50 as an additional  flushing oil I and just idled the engines a few minutes only before changing to the new 5W-40 oil. Upon startup, I thought that I was hearing the dreaded VVTi rattle noise for a few moments until the 5W-40 oil circulated into the VVTi oil lines.

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8 hours ago, campbeam said:

 

Lets us just say that I definitely know that 20 grade WILL definitely mess with the operation of the VVTi controller on my 2006 Aurion. I was using 20W-50 as an additional  flushing oil I and just idled the engines a few minutes only before changing to the new 5W-40 oil. Upon startup, I thought that I was hearing the dreaded VVTi rattle noise for a few moments until the 5W-40 oil circulated into the VVTi oil lines.

It's good how we have the ability to research these things freely thanks to the internet because a lot of people still don't really understand the ramifications of potentially using the wrong oil, especially the older school who are stuck in a time warp and still think an engine is an engine hahaha.. These aren't a Holden red, grey or blue motor or and old pre crossflow 250 4.1lt Ford for example. Sheesh, those engines were so bad they were happy with any oil you put in them as long as it was a 20w - 50. If there was a 20W - 100 that would've been very useful too 🤣

If you got 100,000 kays out of one with no smoke you're doing ok. 

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It has taken me a while to realise that all 2GR-FE engines are not manufactured the same. Overall design and specifications may have remained the same but improved manufacturing processes are resulting in achieving tighter tolerances. This is why I am starting to be more specific in my posts for the 40 series Aurion and the 50 series Aurion.

Choosing the right oil viscosity is all about engine protection and reduced engine wear and not only at start up.

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Thanks for all the reply’s/ advice. The handbook does still recommend 15w40 as an option even for temps as low as minus 10 degrees!

my 2 services so far through ownership has been with my local Toyota and I called another Toyota where the car originated from and they service with 15w40 or 10w30. I guess now the decision for me is whether to just go to my local mechanic for a quick oil change or run with this until next April when I’m due my next service and change then. 
ive included a picture of the manuals oil recommendations 

 

F5F8F584-5735-4641-AB63-EFE2B3EE1EE6.jpeg

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42 minutes ago, Chris H said:

Thanks for all the reply’s/ advice. The handbook does still recommend 15w40 as an option even for temps as low as minus 10 degrees!

my 2 services so far through ownership has been with my local Toyota and I called another Toyota where the car originated from and they service with 15w40 or 10w30. I guess now the decision for me is whether to just go to my local mechanic for a quick oil change or run with this until next April when I’m due my next service and change then. 
ive included a picture of the manuals oil recommendations 

 

F5F8F584-5735-4641-AB63-EFE2B3EE1EE6.jpeg

I read the start of your post [before seeing the attached picture] and immediately thought that you were misinterpreting the temperature range chart. My apologies; nothing wrong with your interpretation.

At least I pulled out my owner's manual for the 2006 Aurion. Underneath the chart, It includes the following recommendation: "If you use SAE 10W-30 or a higher viscosity engine oil in extremely low temperatures, the engine may become difficult to start, so SAE 5W-30 engine oil is recommended." 

It looks like you are not DIY so the hip pocket nerve is in play to avoid unnecessary oil changes. In your case, get your $$$ worth of the current oil before changing oil. 

Oil change interval is usually based upon both time and distance rather than engine running hours. 1000 kms of driving in peak hour with lots of stop start motoring is very different to same distance of urban off peak driving or highway driving.

Always plenty of debate about when to change oil. As a rule of thumb, when you check the oil level on the dipstick if the oil is so dark and discoloured that you cannot easily see the metal of the dipstick, then an oil change is definitely due. Also helps to wipe the dipstick with a tissue so you can see how badly discoloured or contaminated the oil is. Old school approach is a 5000 km oil change interval. For an extended oil change interval, then you need to be using a better quality oil e.g. full synthetic. 

 

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Thanks @campbeam I normally change oil on time basis as I don’t tend to reach the kilometers before the time period. I could get the guys at work to help me change the oil as a potential saving but was still thinking if the handbook recommends it then perhaps I can change grade at the next service as it seems to be an uncommon engine oil grade to use judging by the other responses and research. 
 

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@ZZT86 hi I live in western Sydney towards the blue mountains so don’t tend to get many extremely cold winter mornings. Average 4 to 7 with a few ranging from 0-4 degrees. 
The handbook with the car still recommends 15w40 even at minus 10 degrees. Obviously the Oil  grade that’s been used at my last service seems a bit uncommon so I should perhaps go for a different grade at the next service. 

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38 minutes ago, Chris H said:

@ZZT86 hi I live in western Sydney towards the blue mountains so don’t tend to get many extremely cold winter mornings. Average 4 to 7 with a few ranging from 0-4 degrees. 
The handbook with the car still recommends 15w40 even at minus 10 degrees. Obviously the Oil  grade that’s been used at my last service seems a bit uncommon so I should perhaps go for a different grade at the next service. 

I don't live all that far from you myself either. If you have a 50 series Aurion I would just stick with the 5w-30.  You'll find many other modern cars will actually use this same grade so don't let the numbers put you off or scare you into thinking it can harm your engine. Quite the contrary actually.

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On 8/25/2020 at 10:40 PM, Chris H said:

 I’ve had my aurion for close to 2 years and at both services (with toyota) they’ve used 15w40.

I also really suspect Toyota use this grade because it's much cheaper and they would get it in bulk for next to nothing. I really cannot see a stealership use proper fully synthetic unless the customer asks for it and then not only take an exorbitant amount, but your wallet too. 

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I made a mental note of a previous post in another thread about Toyota dealerships buying their oil in bulk i.e. 44 gallon drums. This makes economic sense with a one size fits all approach. Not sure if this is still a current practice especially with newer engines having more specific oil specifications. 

Getting back on track with this thread. From the information provided, Chris is most likely doing 2 oil changes per year with the next one due in April 2021 and then October. Also, he is driving less than 5K between oil changes plus cold winter mornings some as low as 0 C degrees. 

Looks like 5W-30 would be the preference for the winter months. 

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I further the above comments on dealers changing oils on some cars because it suits them but still within the cars book guidelines. Before buying my GSV50R Aurion I quizzed the selling & servicing dealer about their sudden change from 10W30 in the 1st three services to 5W30 in the last one & they freely admitted to it that it suited their current range of cars requirements which doesn't at all surprise me. They will buy in bulk hundreds of litres of oil at one time.

@Chris H  Thanks Chris, the reason I asked is based on climate. If you were in a hotter climate like on the Gold Coast or even further north then the heavier 15W40 would be just about perfect, but Sydney isn't all that different to arctic Melbourne & still think it's a little too heavy for a GSV50R Aurion but OK for the current OCI.

Certainly Ash makes a great point about differentiating the 2 model series in that there are differences in the VVT controller from 40 to 50 series cars to avoid that dreaded "tap tap" tapping noise that was prevalent in the older cars.

 

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7 hours ago, ZZT86 said:

Thanks Chris, the reason I asked is based on climate. If you were in a hotter climate like on the Gold Coast or even further north then the heavier 15W40 would be just about perfect, but Sydney isn't all that different to arctic Melbourne & still think it's a little too heavy for a GSV50R Aurion but OK for the current OCI.

Being around 30 mins West of where I am, the mountains area get pretty damn cold in the winter hence my arguement to absolutely stick with 5W-30

7 hours ago, ZZT86 said:

Certainly Ash makes a great point about differentiating the 2 model series in that there are differences in the VVT controller from 40 to 50 series cars to avoid that dreaded "tap tap" tapping noise that was prevalent in the older cars.

I'd love to know how many changes the engineers actually did. They all look the same on the surface but as you said, there are small differences, namely that VVT controller. You almost never hear of any issues in the 50 series 2GR-FE. Just saying..

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  • 1 month later...
2 hours ago, prometheus said:

I have a 2011 Touring that I bought in 2012 as a demo (13 000klms) and have been using HPR 5 5W-40 (Full Synthetic) every 10 000klms (around once per year) and so far so good. 

Sounds good to me J. Try not to let it go beyond the 10K mark as you may know these engines are prone to sludging up and it will have you chasing your tail trying to de-sludge it.

Oil is pretty cheap, especially when it goes on sale at the various outlets we announce here, so even doing it twice a year wouldn't be a bad idea.

For someone who only clocks 10K per year, can I ask if your doing short trips ?? If you are I would definitely do it twice a year to be honest. It's not uncommon to do the oil every 5K.

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Greetings Gents...

I've just had my 3rd oil change this year..started with Penrite 5w40 for first oil change after buying the car in march this year..and now have had 2 oil changes with Penrite 5w30..all full synthetic. Maybe its my imagination, but the car seems to drive quieter and even smother on the 5w30..

Just an observation..

Fuel economy on long trips is unchanged..

Cheers...

Edited by Bigmike62
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1 hour ago, ZZT86 said:

Then you must have an a s s & sensitivity just like Niki Lauder 😉

 

I also use my fingertips on the steering wheel and the shaft of the gear shifter to check for vibrations and to confirm the perceived smoothness of the engine. Also more hearing tyre noise rather than engine noise when I have the window down slightly when driving.

The other kind of sensitivity comes more into play when throwing the car around some tight hairpin bends.

My Aurion is also driving and quieter after a recent road trip. Currently using 5W40 full synthetic engine oil but next oil change will most likely be 5W30 full synthetic.

A hot wet summer is forecast so maybe a 10W40 oil could be used instead.

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  • 3 years later...

Always want to learn more from the experts and their opinions based upon their years of experience. This YouTube video appeared in my feed. Not saying that I understand any of the this except that it makes sense when you consider that oil additives wear out or break down. I did make note that timing chains are attributed as a factor for the shearing impact upon the oil additives. I am still thinking that it comes back to using a quality known brand engine oil and an appropriate oil change interval for your specific vehicle and driving conditions. 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Love this guy, he's so passionate about tribology & all that work for some results. I now understand why some nerds out there mix their own oils ! Thanks Ash !

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