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  1. I have got a more basic serpentine belt kit which did the job for me. However, I can see the benefit of spending the extra $$$ for a more comprehensive kit. I previously acquired a set of 6 extra long spanners with zero offset from Trade Tools. Got the 8mm size but missing 11mm, 20mm and 21mm. The extra 7th spanner makes your selected kit that bit more comprehensive. The extra length does give you more leverage for undoing those bolts in restricted spaces where you may not be able to fit another tool. I do have a separate 24mm ring spanner that I picked up from a clearance bin at either SuperCheap Auto or Autobarn. It is my goto spanner for the refill bolt on the side of the Aurion's auto transmission. More than likely I picked it up to complete a larger size range not realizing at the time that it was going to be so handy.
    2 points
  2. I recently got into a situation where my Aurion hesitated upon hard acceleration from a low speed. An internet article suggested that a solution or part of the solution would be to clean the throttle position sensor. Started doing some research and eBay listings indicated that this sensor was a bolt on part. However, as I discovered when I actually removed the throttle body on my 40 series Aurion, the throttle position sensor is actually riveted to the throttle body. Attached picture is from an eBay listing for a used throttle body and you can see that it can do with a decent clean before being fitted.. I had recently cleaned the throttle body when it was attached to the intake and decided to give it a more thorough clean. As I could not actually remove the throttle position sensor, I placed the throttle body so that the shaft for the butterfly valve was vertical. I then sprayed some WD40 into the area a few times and let the WD40 penetrate and hopefully do some cleaning. This was done to both ends of the shaft. Upon reassembly, I attached the lower coolant hose to the throttle body then using a small funnel was able to pour some coolant into the upper coolant hose until coolant spurted out of the throttle body. Upper coolant hose was then refitted. It took a few attempts to start the engine before it started. I was thinking that the engine was idling higher a bit noisier, then discovered that I had not refitted a hose from the oil catch can to the intake. Everything sounded normal after refitting that hose so ready for a test drive which ended up being a drive to a beach on the Gold Coast. All good because I was able to test some hard acceleration from 80kph[roadworks] back up to 110kph speed limit. Later when coming home after exiting the freeway, I had a few more tests from a stationery stop at the traffic lights up to the various speed limits. Acceleration and gear changes were totally smooth and I attribute this to a lot of recent maintenance as well as this additional cleaning. Main finding is that it was worthwhile to remove the throttle body to be able to give it that extra bit of a thorough clean to be just like new
    2 points
  3. LOL as Paul Hogan would say NOW THATS A SPANNER, great additions mate ty for the Pic's KAA
    2 points
  4. Hi Tony, I'm not sure if you would call the below burnt (I only put it into the bottle this morning, and so this is my first proper look at the oil) I was looking forward to trying a different oil, the place uses Valvoline full synthetic, but I'm glad that I didn't. Simply from the point of view of seeing how the transmission is with new genuine oil, I can now say that the shifting is smoother than before the oil change (it wasn't harsh, but I can tell the difference). If I had gone straight to a non-genuine oil, it would have led me to the conclusion that the non-genuine oil is better than the OEM oil (because of the smoother shifting) I bought the car brand new (Oct 17 build from memory, and purchased in Feb 18) My car doesn't have an Auto cooler, but does have an auto fluid heater (or is it heat exchange unit??), so perhaps that may be why it was fairly dark considering the "low" km's I don't do any towing, and whilst I drive it spiritedly at times, I wouldn't have said that I drive it "hard" @ 2:39 to the right of the radiator hose (for the auto fluid heater)
    2 points
  5. Come easing of these constant erratic lockdowns in Australia. When we're allowed to travel around the state, where do you all plan on going ?. And what car will you be taking ? I've hardly been able to drive my Toyota at the moment due to 2 small issues i'm getting rectified. Keep safe everyone !
    1 point
  6. Should note: ADR specifies the maximum error. The biggest change is now under any condition/test a vehicle as delivered by the manufacturer cannot have a true rod speed that is above the indicated speed. The are also some provisions around the visual accuracy of reading the instruments as well which is where the 4km/h typically can be explained off. From memory the 4km/h is arbitrary because it’s the largest whole number under 5, and the wording is something like “the operator must be able to determine the the reading within x% of the scale”. Which broadly means if you see the needle half way between the 90 and 100 marks you must be doing less than 95. But if parallax error due to seating position means you are seeing the needle position on scale differently (like your passengers do) then you would still have a margin of safety. This is why often a digital readout speedometer is “more accurate” than the gauge style because it doesn’t actually have to deliberately over read to get around visual interpretation of needle position. Obviously the percentage error is also about mechanical (and digital relationships between rotating items). Some cars have incredibly accurate speedometers that are near perfect to 40km/h then from that point adopt an exact 4km/h over read.
    1 point
  7. My thoughts exactly ! He's a wizard harry 🤣🤣
    1 point
  8. Counselling, what counselling?😁 Actually I find your acknowledged OCD quite inspiring which nicely offsets my tendencies to use quick workarounds. Better to do the job once and do it right then have to come back and do it all again. Also having the right specialised tools makes tasks so much easier and enjoyable instead of being a time wasting frustrating exercise. Good quality tools are worth the $$$.
    1 point
  9. I know Ash, my bad 🤪 I didn't realise it was that low, despite the fuel warning light being on and for the time I start it and run it, it is only for around 10 or less minutes anyway so I figured it couldn't hurt the fuel pump for that duration. It doesn't get started all that often for many obvious factors, but having it on a trickle charge means I don't have to always turn it over. I will redeem myself on the next available opportunity
    1 point
  10. Ah the goood ol' days. I used to love the Paul Hogan show. The Benny Hill show was another great one. What's happened to TV ?? It's gone downhill since then. Can't have shows like this anymore. Everyone is terrified someone may get offended, God forbid, the poor petals. 😄😜
    1 point
  11. A big killer of TBs is moving the butterfly valve too fast. It ruins the elec motor inside it. That link the OP posted mentions that. Only use TB cleaner!
    1 point
  12. I have owned a GSU40R series Kluger "2WD" since new for 9.5 years now. Mine only has 120,000km on it but it has has a varied life. As you are looking to buy a used one it can be pot luck on what you get... as with any used car. People (and dealerships/mechanics can do some bad things to cars. Oil sludge... This can happen with any modern motor, it is not unique to the 2GRFE motor. I did see one report where someone did complain of it but when the truth came out he admitted he had not changed the oil for OVER 5 years!! I have seen other cars where the oil has turned to the consistency of a crayon for exactly the same reason. I know in the US the 1st generation did have a problem caused by the crank case ventilation outlet being in the wrong location and a TSA recommended moving it to the front valve cover area and the problem ceased. I'm not sure if the 1st generation here had the same problem. Mine does not have a hint of it. THE CURE. Change the oil every 10,000 km or 12 months, use FULL synthetic 5-30 oil. Only use Toyota or Ryco oil filters and ensure they are installed correctly. If installed incorrectly they can crush and impede the oil flow. Maintenance... Oil change as previously mentioned. Air filter every 20,000km (Toyota or Ryco) and at that time clean the PCV valve, MAF* sensor and Throttle Body*. (*) Only use cleaners intended for this purpose. The service schedule states 80,000km for transmission service. Make sure this is done. The cooling system in modern cars is the ticking time bomb with most modern cars. This must be done on time and dont skimp on the coolant used or the method in replacing it. Ensure it is bled correctly afterwards. The rest is common with most cars, serpentine belt, pulleys, tensioners, sensors, water pump, etc... The timing chain is metal so should last the life of the car. Suspension... The handling is ok for the size and height of the car but seems a bit soft. I have fitted new KYB struts to the rear recently and it improved the handling noticeably and will be fitting them to the front soon. 2WD or AWD... I weighed up this when I was buying one. My cars for the previous 20 yrs or so were all FWD and I never had any problem with them on slippery roads. Naturally you have to drive to conditions and be sensible with the accelerator. The 2GRFE V6 is a powerful motor so you need to respect it. Good tyres are a must (Michelin). I have found the Kluger (2WD) has better traction in that regard than my other cars. Tyre wear is excellent. I got over 80,000km from my last set (Michelin) although the factory Dunlops were shot at 25,000km. The Michelins could have gone another 20,000km easily. The things that turned me off the AWD were the additional purchase price of the car, the extra weight, the extra servicing cost and the higher fuel consumption. Again that choice will be up to you and your intended use of the car. You get torque steer on all FWD cars. I cant recall noticing it on the Kluger though. BTW... The Kluger is basically an Aurion station wagon. It has a sedan type chassis and is not a bush bashing truck or suitable for towing large vans. I have towed a 14ft one with mine and it was no problem but I did not push it. The Prado or Hilux would be more suited to that sort of use. Overall I have found it to be a great car. Good for long trips, nice to drive, quiet and comfortable and surprisingly economical. Good luck with your search, I hope you find a good one.
    1 point
  13. It's hard to say unless you've had it against a GPS based speed, or if you've been caught speeding too I guess in which case the copper will disclose your exact speed, in which case we'd deny it with a puzzled look on our face lol... I'm not sure how far back this speedo error thing goes, but I would assume a 2003 car would have it. My M3 has a rather bigger than usual error I suspect, but I will have to confirm this next time I get to drive it against my google maps. It's puzzling for sure.
    1 point
  14. Next on the list is a set of Long Aviation Ring Spanners. Been wanting these for ages and kept forgetting to search, but the search is now over as these got delivered not that long ago and I couldn't be happier. Value for money and very decent quality too so I am pretty stoked. No need to spend big bucks on so called fancy "name brands". Believe me, these are just as good for a fraction of the price. They start from 10mm and go all the way up to 24mm. When I say these are long, I mean they are long !. The 22mm-24mm spanner is as long as my arm !! Now that's some good leverage right there !
    1 point
  15. So it’s said a picture is worth a thousand words. First the cluster, which we want to match the white and blue illumination. This is how the selector quadrant lights up with the White LED instead of the green. Lastly the white window switches. Perfect 🙂
    1 point
  16. I am sure that I have previously viewed this YouTube video which appeared in my suggested viewing list today. The 26 minute mark on relates to the WS specification fluid. Good point is made about the aftermarket fluids and what specifications that they claim to be compatible or complying with. Had to check and Penrite only mentions Toyota WS specification only and not any other Toyota specification.
    1 point
  17. Yep. Looks like it's a big con job by Toyota. Flash point on the older fluid is actually higher therefore better than the so called "new" formulation. Go figure. Toyota have others make it for them, call it "Genuine Toyota Fluid" then sell it to us for four times it's real value. That's a big lie right there. I'll stick to my Penrite LV all day long thanks. Not to discourage anyone else using WS fluid either. It's purely your choice.
    1 point
  18. WS is a Toyota specification for ATF which was released in 2002. In the past, mineral or semi-synthetic oils may very well have been used to meet the standard. Current aftermarket ATF meeting the WS specification are described as full synthetic. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toyota_Automatic_Transmission_Fluid#2002_-_WS_Fluid https://aisinaftermarket.com/uploads/fslqkiuy_ATF-0WS_TDS.pdf https://totachi.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/TDS_ATF-WS-1.pdf https://penriteoil.com.au/assets/pis_pdfs/ATF LV (Full Syn) .pdf I had previously viewed this YouTube video. Factual enough for me to remain using the aftermarket Penrite ATF LV.
    1 point
  19. Yep. Cherry is a good sign. When it teters on the side of brown, you know it's bad bad.
    1 point
  20. Did you solve this problem? It most probably is the computer ECU. The early 2000 RAV4 automatics had a problem with the ECU that controls transmission. The ECU used non-lead solder as an environmental thing, but it is not as good in situations with vibration. There is a guy in Melbourne who will send you a rebuilt ECU and instructions and you send back your ECU after you fix it. ECUMAN.com.au. I did it and it worked fine.
    1 point
  21. Thanks Ashley for that info, to be honest I was surprised at the high cost of the filter, especially if it is a serviceable item (and why Toyota had only 1 in stock in Sydney). I was looking at the Valvoline which is full synthetic as well, but for at least this first fluid change I'm glad that I went genuine. Because I can feel the difference in the shifting compared to before, and if I had gone straight to non-genuine I may have come to the conclussion that the better shifting was due to the non-genuine oil being better than OEM. My car doesn't have an auto cooler, but has a ATF fluid heater? @ 2:39 to the right of the top radiator hose
    1 point
  22. Short answer, no. Unlike some overseas variants which are able to reflashed such as the Corolla XRS, Sportivo's aren't able to be reflashed or tuned. There a few known ECU's that work, you can use a Greddy V-Manage and E-Manage together which basically gives all of the options a standalone ECU will, albeit they're quite out dated. I personally ran a V-Manage for a few years before moving onto an Adaptronic E420D which is a lot newer and has all of the features plus a whole lot more over an E and V Manage combo. Other known ECU's that people use are the Apexi Power FC (2ZZ Celica unit) with an adaptor harness, which is proven and works but super out dated even compared to a Greddy Combo. AEM, Link, Haltech and Adaptronic all work after a working out the wiring as a standalone ECU. The Adaptronic I'm running is wired in as a piggyback unit so I still retain the stock ECU and have all my accessories and cluster working with no issues albeit, the temperature gauge is off which a fix has since being found by my mate who tuned my car and I have a check engine light due to the fact I'm running a different O2 and Lamda setup so the stock ECU does this as it can't read that sensor anymore. Another benefit of this unit is that I no longer need the MAF sensor as I'm running a MAP sensor now which is nice bonus for running less restrictive intake setups. If you're really keen on going down the route of tuning a 2ZZ, it's best you search the web for these units and choose which one fits your intended build outcome in terms of tunability, pricing etc. Best of luck.
    1 point
  23. What I am offering is an opinion, [not actual experience] based upon a fair bit of research for maintaining/servicing automatic transmissions. What you have briefly indicated is extreme driving conditions for the auto transmission. Towing heavy loads qualifies as extreme driving conditions. Normal driving condition is cruising down the highway at the speed limits. Higher temperatures shorten the lifespan of the automatic transmission fluid. Being able to maintain a cooler temperature will ensure that the ATF will last and continue to provide the necessary lubrication and protection for your transmission. My advice/recommendation is to have the largest transmission cooler suitable for your intended driving conditions professionally fitted.
    1 point
  24. Good stuff Stephen. Glad it all went well. So you reckon the fluid was burnt even at 61k ?? Did you buy the car new or used ? I would expect the fluid to be slightly darker than new fluid but not burnt at that stage in its life. Can you post up the fluid sample you have please ? When I did my trans service, my car had clocked up around 120K if I recall, and the fluid I drained was the original factory fill fluid and it wasn't even close to being burnt. Infact, It would've happily kept on going for many more kays. The fluid was a darker shade of red from original to be honest, but, I flushed it anyway as you already know using the Penrite LV ATF. It's been running flawelessly to date. The Penrite LV is compatible with WS so don't be afraid to use it in the future. You will save a bomb and have the added benefit of fully synthetic protection. Also, as Ashley mentioned, the so called "filter", in our opinion doesn't need to be replaced unless the fluid was really really bad. It's only a strainer and designed to catch larger material. If you reached that stage, then you may as well kiss the trans goodbye anyway. The pan magnets catch all the fine material and any residual stuff from the casting process. I think you could get away with just leaving the original filter/strainer. I plan on puting mine back in on the next pan drain and ditching the aftermarket rubbish paper filter. That kit was a true waste of money. It came with a lesser quality filter and a crappy cork gasket. In hindsight, that was a bad move installing it. It's holding up ok for now, but next time around I will put it all back to factory, with a Genuine Toyota pan gasket.
    1 point
  25. Struth ! Not cheap. Having said that, once every 60K kms is much cheaper than a new auto transmission. Well done for looking after your car 😉
    1 point
  26. You are on the right track particularly if you are going to be a long term owner. There have been quite a number of posts about changing the ATF in the Aurion Forum. I understand that quite a number of members are using Penrite LV ATF which is a full synthetic ATF conforming to the WS specification. When last on special at Repco, price was $36.90 for 4 litres. There has been a bit of a debate whether the ATF filter needs to be replaced as Toyota refers to it as a strainer and does not specify a replacement interval. Aftermarket ATF filters appear to have a paper element and a service replacement interval. Fortunately, I retained the original part so at some future stage it will be refitted to the transmission. Now having said that, your Camry will presumably have a different transmission [U660E in the Aurion] but the servicing principles are the same. Regular transmission servicing is an excellent preventative maintenance measure.
    1 point
  27. I’m sure by now you’ve worked out that I’m quite happy to make subtle tweaks and changes to Sebastian. Some are practical, while others are more about making him feel more like “ours” and a little less like someone’s Uber ride. The rubber shift knob was one of those things. It’s functional, it’s not too worn, but ultimately I felt it was a little more “base model” than mid-spec. Enter my stunning new knob. Looks like it should have been there since day 0!
    1 point
  28. Started the Aurion this morning and heard a grinding noise similar to this YouTube video. Bad Water Pump Bearing Noise - Bing video Investigated and loosened the serpentine belt tensioner hoping that it was one of the idler pulleys rather than the water pump. There was movement on the water pump pulley so the bearing is on the way out. Odometer reading is 226,005kms. Ordered a replacement water pump and gasket on eBay so hopefully will arrive by next Friday. Not exactly happy as planned road trip will have to be deferred plus not a straight forward task. In hindsight, I should have had the part on hand.
    1 point
  29. I've just put 19 x 8's on my Presara. Had to get specific 'Off-set' to keep the tyre inside the rim as required in W.A. Very little choice in this size though. Most are 19 x 8.5's. They look great and give a much better road feel and sharper handling. Alan
    1 point
  30. 2k to do this job is a rip off. Pure and simple. If others are doing it for 1/4 of that then you have to wonder. I understand it's a fiddly process and would gladly pay someone to do it for me, but not 2k. Now Way ! Another point worth mentioning would be to have the serpentine belt and tensioners replaced too as this has to be removed anyway. Especially those higher mileage 40 series cars. Also, for the Toyota dealer who said the engine has to come out needs his head read. Seriously.
    1 point




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