Jump to content


Why no hybird Tarago in Australia?


Pong

Recommended Posts


1) Because a hybrid version of a Tarago (already a stretch for most families at ~$45k) would be even more expensive and out of reach for the target market. The Prius V takes the role of hybrid 7-seat people-mover, and the Camry Hybrid the cheap affordable family hybrid sedan (it is only cheap because it is subsidised by the government).

2) Because luxury versions tend to eschew passenger capacity for extra room and comfort - same reason the big luxury sedans (BMW 7-series, Mercedes S-class, Porsche Panamera etc) only seat 4 (2 in the back), because the rear bench gets turned into 2 bucket-style seats and an central arm-rest/console

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1) Because Toyota Australia know that the Tarago owns the market big time without the need of a Hybrid version. Saying that I would love an AWD Hybrid Estima.

2) Have you sat in the middle row captain's chairs?! My favourite row of seats in my folks' GLX.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If Toyota is reading this, they should import Taraga Hybird.

Why?

1. Toyota cannot use Hybird Privus V to expect people, who need the space of Tarago and 8 seat arrange to buy PriusV, because Prius V does not have enough space and room and engine power for big family. That's why so many big family who use Tarago a lot needs Hybird options.

2. Noone will buy Hybird Option such as Prius C because small car already fuel efficent, it make no senses to pay more buck to buy small car with Hybird.

3. It makes more sense to buy Prado/Kruger Hybird, because Prado is fuel hungry 4WD

4. I would like Toyota to offer more Hybird 4WD. Toyota canot use Lexus Hybird 4WD to omit Toyota has no it own option Hybird 4WD, People who pay big buck for Lexus, will not buy cheaper Toyota 4WD.

5. I hope Toyota fulfil his promise to offer more Hybird to his entire fleet by 2020. People will then trust recoginise Toyota is really an environment sustainable automobile company.

Link to comment
Share on other sites


If Toyota is reading this, they should import Taraga Hybird.

Why?

1. Toyota cannot use Hybird Privus V to expect people, who need the space of Tarago and 8 seat arrange to buy PriusV, because Prius V does not have enough space and room and engine power for big family. That's why so many big family who use Tarago a lot needs Hybird options.

Agreed. However, you can't deny that the Prius V does cover some of the market for a family hybrid, especially a young one (no need for gangly teenagers sitting in back row seats)

2. Noone will buy Hybird Option such as Prius C because small car already fuel efficent, it make no senses to pay more buck to buy small car with Hybird.

A Prius C is only about $2000 more than an equivalent-spec Yaris (YRX)., and with 40% better fuel economy. Assuming average yearly travel of 20,000km, the Prius will pay off that excess purchase cost in less than 3 years.

3. It makes more sense to buy Prado/Kruger Hybird, because Prado is fuel hungry 4WD

A Prado is a proper off-roader (hence the dual fuel tanks, full time proper 4WD system and diesel option). You don't want a finicky delicate hybrid set up in a big dirt-road rock-basher. The Kluger, on the other hand, would be a better prospect as it is a soft-roader that only ever sees the dirt carpark at the kid's soccer ground, however it is not built in RHD configuration (it is not sold on the Japanese market, and is built in the US)

4. I would like Toyota to offer more Hybird 4WD. Toyota canot use Lexus Hybird 4WD to omit Toyota has no it own option Hybird 4WD, People who pay big buck for Lexus, will not buy cheaper Toyota 4WD.

See above - proper off-roaders are not suitable for hybrid systems as they currently stand, and Toyota's main soft-roader hybrid (Kluger/Highlander) is only sold in the US

5. I hope Toyota fulfil his promise to offer more Hybird to his entire fleet by 2020. People will then trust recoginise Toyota is really an environment sustainable automobile company.

Toyota already has more hybrid versions of it's production cars than any other manufacturer and are a world leader in hybrid technology (BMW have even come to them for hybrid technology, and that is saying something). I think they are already trusted and recognised....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

IMO hybrids are not really an environmentally friendly option... Sure they use less fuel, but what about the environmental impact of the manufacturing process?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

IMO hybrids are not really an environmentally friendly option... Sure they use less fuel, but what about the environmental impact of the manufacturing process?

I agree that the impact of the battery production isn't as good as it could be (same goes for the logistics, with battery material going twice around the world from being dug out of the ground to installed into cars), but I still think hybrid development and acceptance is important now as an instigator for future development. The hybrids of today are not as efficient over a full life-cycle as they could be, but they are the genesis of the better and cheaper hybrids and alt-fuels of tomorrow.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

An alternative would be to offer an LPG hybrid version. Cuts out the costly batteries and electrical engineering at a cheaper price.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

I have the feeling that they can be imported as 'Grey Market', that there is a compliancing yard in Canberra (need to check RAWS).

A Hybrid Estima would be great as a City Taxi - to help keep smog down and move lots of people comfortabaly.

But all Estima imports have to be complied as a CamperVan (I think Toyota Australia have helped impose this - they don't want competition against the local market)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have the feeling that they can be imported as 'Grey Market', that there is a compliancing yard in Canberra (need to check RAWS).

A Hybrid Estima would be great as a City Taxi - to help keep smog down and move lots of people comfortabaly.

But all Estima imports have to be complied as a CamperVan (I think Toyota Australia have helped impose this - they don't want competition against the local market)

I think you'll find that it is the government imposing it, not Toyota. Standard rule of modern grey imports is that there can't be a locally sold equivalent of the body (in this case, the Tarago) unless the vehicle is deemed to be a "specialist or enthusiast vehicle" (the SEVS register)

To quote the RAWS (Registered Automotive Workshop Scheme, which determines who can import and comply vehicles)

The History of RAWS

The Early Days

The RAWS story begins back in the 1980's when the Full-Volume manufacturers supplying vehicles to the Australian market began cutting back the range of cars they supplied in order to reduce cost. Japanese manufacturers couldn't justify the costs of modifying the vehicles to the Australian Design Rules (ADRs) for such small numbers, and there was a very similar story for European manufacturers.

Low Volume Scheme Begins

Luckily for those who weren't satisfied with the choice offered in the Australian market, certain amendments were made to the Motor Vehicle Standards Act which allowed individual importers to alter foreign cars so they complied with the ADRsand then supply them to the Australian market. The first imports were mainly from America but in the early to mid 1990's importers started to turn their attention to Japanese vehicles. Japanese vehicles had several advantages: they were already right hand drive, they tended to be more recent models due to strict registration laws and the cars often had low kilometres and a good maintainance history. A further attraction of the Japanese models were their extra features that were rarely available on Australian vehicles.

Soon used car lots were filling up with Nissan, Mazda and Toyota brands and at very competitive prices in the luxury car market. The benefits of importing these cars were felt and the figures speak for themselves. In 1993 just over a thousand cars were imported through the low volume scheme but by 2002 more than 16000 for the year were imported. The total number of low-volume imports, however, was still under 100,000.

The Era of RAWS

A new chapter to the industry began on May 8th of 2003 when the Specialist and Enthusiast Vehicle Scheme (SEVS) was implemented. Since the implementation ofSEVS the number of imports has been slowed. The scheme came as a response to some loopholes in the low-volume import scheme which allowed a small number of unscrupulous operators to flaunt the law. Some importers took advantage of the scheme and a poor quality product for the consumer resulted. SEVS put an end to damaged or rusted cars being imported for any reason except parts, and additionally required all used imports now have to be certified by a Registered Automotive Workshop (RAW). Hence the Registered Automotive Workshop Scheme was born.

To be eligible under SEVS a vehicle is required to meet at least two of the four Specialist and Enthusiast criteria. It is then necessary for a RAW to hold documentary evidence that the vehicle meets the requirements of the ADRs, as required by the "Approval to Place Used Import Plates Determination" current at the time, and have the vehicle added to their schedule. Then the RAW is able to import up to 100 of these vehicles per annum (subject to a category limit of 100 vehicles per annum). It is worth noting that vehicles manufactured prior to 1 January 1989 fall outside the SEVS ruling, though these vehicles still require an engineer's certificate to be registered in Australia. Although the SEVS scheme has caused the price of imports to increase slightly it is committed to delivering a safer and higher quality product for the consumer and should keep Australian enthusiasts satisfied with affordable imports.

To be eligible (and there is a long process involved too) to be on the SEVS register, a car must meet 2 out of 4 criteria, as below

Ruling: A vehicle is eligible under the SEVS if it has never been sold in Australia in full volume and complies with 2 of the 4 following criteria.

  • Appearance: The vehicle must be different and unique in its appearance.
  • Unusual Design Features: The vehicle must have an unusual design feature.
  • Performance: The vehicle must meet a minimum power to weight ratio.
  • Specialist Publications: The vehicle is advertised regularly in a specialist publication
A hybrid Tarago would most likely only meet 1 of those criteria (Unusual Design Feature), maybe 2 (Performance, but I can't remember the kW/kg ratio). This is why you only really saw the performance versions of Chasers/Skylines etc imported as they could only meet Performance and Appearance criteria (they're not Unusual, and I don't think Hot4s counts as a "specialist publication")
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




  • Join The Club

    Join the Toyota Owners Club and be part of the Community. It's FREE!

  • Latest Postings

    1. 0

      Replace Front RH park light Corolla 2006

    2. 5

      Oil leak help!

    3. 0

      Oil Leak

    4. 1

      Aftermarket Air Intake

    5. 1

      Head Unit with Apple CarPlay

    6. 0

      RZN169 Poor fuel economy and low/rough idle at cold start up

    7. 0

      Any RA 60 owners?

    8. 0

      Bluetooth stopped working

    9. 0

      Purchasing 2014 Prado GXL - Requesting Inputs

×
×
  • Create New...

Forums


News


Membership