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2003 Camry ACV36R How to disconnect fuel line at fuel rail


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I am in the process of removing the head to replace a leaking head gasket. I purchased a fuel line disconnect set from Supercheap to disconnect the fuel line at the fuel rail but they do not work. Its seems that the Camry had an extra ridge in the fuel line which prevents this type of tool from engaging with the quick disconnect on the fuel line.
Can someone please advise the correct tool to use for this application or alternatively how to make your own.

Thanks, Paul

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Following YouTube video may be useful. Particularly note the 3:35 timing where it briefly shows the tool getting past that 2nd ridge in the fuel line.

 

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5 hours ago, PaulW said:

I am in the process of removing the head to replace a leaking head gasket. I purchased a fuel line disconnect set from Supercheap to disconnect the fuel line at the fuel rail but they do not work. Its seems that the Camry had an extra ridge in the fuel line which prevents this type of tool from engaging with the quick disconnect on the fuel line.
Can someone please advise the correct tool to use for this application or alternatively how to make your own.

Thanks, Paul

Have you tried using two small flat bladed screwdrivers ? All you need to do is put even pressure on either side of the release mechanism and push in. It can be done. Position one screwdriver in your left hand also clasping the feed line preceding the junction then one in the other after the junction and simultaneously push both screwdrivers in to release the mechanism.

I have a quick release fuel line system in my BMW and I have even done it with my finger tips as the release mechanism has a slight turn out which can enable it to be done by hand. But in your case, if yours is like what's in the video, then you will need to do as I mentioned.

If you feel more comfortable with a special tool, by all means seek one out. I'm not aware of any specific tool for your vehicle to be honest. All you need to do really is be able to push the spring loaded inner circumference mechanism in to release the metal tube from it's locking ridge point.

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Thanks campbeam for the video. It certainly clarifies the task at hand. I will see if I can source the Lisle Fuel Disconnect tool locally otherwise I will try Tony Prodigy's suggestion of using two small screwdrivers.
Will let you know how I get on.

Paul 

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Posted (edited)

I was able to disconnect the fuel line at the other end of the hose where it connects to a pipe near the firewall. There was a push type connector that was easily removed.

However I have ordered a Toyota/Nissan Fuel Line Disconnect Tool from a Melbourne company for $8.80. Its due to arrive here tomorrow.

Nissan/Toyota Fuel Injector Feed Line Disconnecting Tool (ozwidetools.com.au)

Meanwhile I have removed the inlet manifold and got closer to the source of the coolant leak.
The photo below shows the tell-tale sign of the coolant leak just under the inlet manifold.

710279172_Camrycoolantleakshowinganti-knocksensor.thumb.jpg.cb5c5924ba69afc220b277dc12bda78e.jpg

The knock sensor is covered in red coolant residue, could it be the source of the leak?

What is the purpose of the foam rubber pad on the side of the engine block? Can it be left off?

Thanks in advance.

Paul

Edited by PaulW
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9 hours ago, PaulW said:

I was able to disconnect the fuel line at the other end of the hose where it connects to a pipe near the firewall. There was a push type connector that was easily removed.

However I have ordered a Toyota/Nissan Fuel Line Disconnect Tool from a Melbourne company for $8.80. Its due to arrive here tomorrow.

It looks like the Toyota quick release mechanism is slightly different to what I thought it was, but the idea is the same though. My BMW fuel line has two outer tangs, I should've explained it a bit better before, but it is essentially the same where you need to push these in to release the locking mech. The Toyota has four inner tabs which need to pushed to release the line. Definitely much easier with a special tool.

What engine do you have there ? It's hard to see from the pic. Can you upload a few more pics so we can get a good look at the situation ?

I doubt the knock sensor would be fitted in the coolant path though, so I couldn't say for sure if this is the source of the leak you have, also not knowing engine type. It could most likely be a head gasket issue.

If you want to find the coolant leak, it would be better to pressurise the system if you already haven't removed any cooling system components. 

I found this article, assuming you have a 4 cyl, but it is interesting nonetheless.

https://bobistheoilguy.com/forums/threads/toyota-4-cyl-with-head-gasket-problems-common.124766/

 

Edited by Tony Prodigy
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Tony, I have the 2AZFE 4 cylinder engine. Stripping down to get the head off now.
Will post pictures once head is off.
Thanks for the link to the video, very informative.

Paul

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48 minutes ago, PaulW said:

Tony, I have the 2AZFE 4 cylinder engine.

Haha, good guess then. That thread should help then.

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On 5/13/2021 at 8:07 PM, PaulW said:

What is the purpose of the foam rubber pad on the side of the engine block? Can it be left off?

I am guessing that the foam rubber pad that you are referring to is that black item near to the knock sensor. I would definitely leave it on the block because it will help to keep any debris out of that void in the engine block. Any debris could potentially knock and vibrate as it moves around thus giving a false reading to the knock sensor.

I was previously wondering if there would be any cooling benefits from removing the engine cover. I reckon that this is a good reason to keep it in place so that there is less chance of debris material getting into that void space near the knock sensor.

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I am using the online version of the Haynes manual for the Camry (courtesy of the National Library of Australia all manuals are available to Australian residents). 
However the manuals seem to be based on the USA models which sometimes differ from the Australian version. This is where YouTube comes to the rescue.
Its been great in clarifying points that the manual skips over.

Had to duck out to Supercheap this afternoon to pick up a set of E-Torx sockets.
For reasons known only to Toyota they used these Torx style nuts on an exhaust support bracket and also some studs in the head.
Still, it was a good excuse to add to my tool collection without complaints from SWMBO. 

Regards

Paul

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13 hours ago, PaulW said:

am using the online version of the Haynes manual for the Camry (courtesy of the National Library of Australia all manuals are available to Australian residents). 
However the manuals seem to be based on the USA models which sometimes differ from the Australian version. This is where YouTube comes to the rescue.
Its been great in clarifying points that the manual skips over.

That can be pretty frustrating. I've been there too. There isn't too much emphasis on Australian delivered cars so much so that the publishers of these will always bias their publications towards the American Market. Thankfully we do have an abundance of online information to get us through.

13 hours ago, PaulW said:

Had to duck out to Supercheap this afternoon to pick up a set of E-Torx sockets.
For reasons known only to Toyota they used these Torx style nuts on an exhaust support bracket and also some studs in the head.
Still, it was a good excuse to add to my tool collection without complaints from SWMBO. 

Always handy to have Torx sets. German cars have these all over the place and have invested in many different sets over the years.

SWMBO is a common theme around here too :laugh:

By the way, you inspired me to seek out a fuel disconnect tool. I found one on Amazon that was too good to resist. I ended up getting two sets with free delivery for under $20. Won't have to use my fingers anymore :biggrin:

 

20210516_093552.jpg

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Those JTech tools seem to be excellent value. I will have to get a set as I have some other cars that could also use them (Jaguar, MX5 & F100).
Do you have a link to the Amazon site?

Regards

Paul

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20 hours ago, PaulW said:

Those JTech tools seem to be excellent value. I will have to get a set as I have some other cars that could also use them (Jaguar, MX5 & F100).
Do you have a link to the Amazon site?

Regards

Paul

https://www.amazon.com.au/gp/product/B07NNT1JTR/ref=ppx_od_dt_b_asin_title_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

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On 5/13/2021 at 8:07 PM, PaulW said:

What is the purpose of the foam rubber pad on the side of the engine block? Can it be left off?

Found a juicy nugget of info regarding that rubber pad. Leave it in place as it is designed to absorb heat generated in the head. There seems to be a design flaw where these engines tend to shear of the rear 3 head bolts from uneven heat distribution.

Watch this video and he explains it from @50 seconds into the video.

 

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