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Hignlander's Big issue was found in China last month. Have a look and test yours in Australia


pengruijun

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I did see this and think two things. Probably both incorrect since i am jumping to conclusions.

1. the chinese hate toyota or want to show them as inept.

2. the car is far too heavy for dry sandy soil and whatever size wheels there isnt the surface area to pull up. I was surprised that traction control didnt sort the problem out and am wondering if they turned traction control off so that it failed the test. you never know.

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big heavy SUV + FWD + MUD = 0 traction... i bet the AWD one would handle it much better.

And listen to the idiotic way he's revving it up the hill to encourage loss of traction, and then jumping on the brakes and coming to a complete stop...

In addition to the above, I think Scott Bell is correct on point 1, either that I don't know how to approach an incline like that...

Gav.

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big heavy SUV + FWD + MUD = 0 traction... i bet the AWD one would handle it much better.

And listen to the idiotic way he's revving it up the hill to encourage loss of traction, and then jumping on the brakes and coming to a complete stop...

In addition to the above, I think Scott Bell is correct on point 1, either that I don't know how to approach an incline like that...

Gav.

Under the customer's request, the Toyota dealer arrange a staff to test on that road. Finally, the Toyota staff still cannot do it.

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I worked in PNG for a while building roads in some pretty rough places and have seen all sorts of vehicles make it up tracks far steeper, muddier and worse than this. Got to be something wrong with the driver if a FWD kluger can't make it up the slope.

2wd hiaces were getting through this (apologies for poor picture quality but it was taken some time ago with an early generation digital camera):

post-11798-1262445395_thumb.jpg

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Something funny here.

Granted my Kluger is AWD , but I use it around the farm and go up slopes steeper and more slippery than these.

When we did work in Western Queensland (around Cunnamulla) we used to take the work vehicles down to the creek and camp overnight. Four 2WD Toyota Hilux's , 1 Holden Rodeo, 1 Ford Station Wagon, 1 Late Model Holden Commodore Station Wagon . We went up and down the banks with ease. I find it hard to believe that this video shows an inept vehicle , more like totally incompetent operators. Also the difference in vehicle weights would contritbute to the inability to climb a slope.

'

just my thoughts

Cheers

Gary

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Haha, More news coming. Currently, people in china call this slope "Highlander Slope". There are more than 10 FWD highlander's owners trying their highlanders. No one can do it successfully. There are only driver loaded when testing. MM~ interesting.

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The tyre is the worst to blame. Need to reduce pressure and cut out the traction control. I am sure they have no idea where the button is.

He is also spinning the wheel from day 1

Edited by Taka
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No offense to the original poster, and no I haven't watched the video, but wow I never would have guessed that a FWD soft-roader designed as a family wagon would have trouble on an off-road 4WD course

Why also is it that people buy Landcruisers/Pajeros/Patrols etc (ie genuine 4WDs with off-road ability) for the school-run yet buy soft-roaders for off-roading and then complain when they don't go far off-road?

Edited by Hiro Protagonist
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I've had the car wheel spinning up a similar incline angle on a mix of hard bedrock, loose gravel/stone and sand (stock tyres). I simply approached again at a faster speed and got up without a problem. To be expected from a FWD station wagon anyway. Don't see a problem.

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No offense to the original poster, and no I haven't watched the video, but wow I never would have guessed that a FWD soft-roader designed as a family wagon would have trouble on an off-road 4WD course

Why also is it that people buy Landcruisers/Pajeros/Patrols etc (ie genuine 4WDs with off-road ability) for the school-run yet buy soft-roaders for off-roading and then complain when they don't go far off-road?

The problem is that the video shows a VW Polo going up the same hill while a Kluger FWD can't

Edited by Taka
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The problem is that the video shows a VW Polo going up the same hill while a Kluger FWD can't

All it boils down to is a small light FWD vehicle can get up a slope a large heavy FWD vehicle can't, you're looking at a difference in mass of about a tonne (roughly 100% the mass of the Polo) yet without a corresponding increase in traction - the Kluger will always suffer. I've been on forest trails that an old Laser or the like could traverse but anything short of a Landrover would have trouble with - being small and light is extremely beneficial, as long as you avoid the big holes/mounds and don't lose traction. Of course, put off-road tyres on the Kluger (chances are the test was done with normal tarmac tyres which are hopeless off-road) and have some variety of locking diff, and even a FWD one can go reasonably far. But put a FWD and a 4WD equivalent in the same circumtance, and the 4WD will _always_ go further.

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The problem is that the video shows a VW Polo going up the same hill while a Kluger FWD can't

All it boils down to is a small light FWD vehicle can get up a slope a large heavy FWD vehicle can't, you're looking at a difference in mass of about a tonne (roughly 100% the mass of the Polo) yet without a corresponding increase in traction - the Kluger will always suffer. I've been on forest trails that an old Laser or the like could traverse but anything short of a Landrover would have trouble with - being small and light is extremely beneficial, as long as you avoid the big holes/mounds and don't lose traction. Of course, put off-road tyres on the Kluger (chances are the test was done with normal tarmac tyres which are hopeless off-road) and have some variety of locking diff, and even a FWD one can go reasonably far. But put a FWD and a 4WD equivalent in the same circumtance, and the 4WD will _always_ go further.

haha, toyota announced the same excuse as you "heavy". But from the customer's point, They do not wish how many off road ability for the FWD highlander. At least, it is not worse than 1.4 polo.

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haha, toyota announced the same excuse as you "heavy". But from the customer's point, They do not wish how many off road ability for the FWD highlander. At least, it is not worse than 1.4 polo.

It's not an "excuse", it's simple physics. Personally I fail to see the point of 2WD soft-roaders in the first place, if you want the high seating position and people-carrying abilities, then get a damn people-mover. It's not like they can justify it with "well I might want to go off-road one day" because they bought the model not _designed_ for off-road work.

Or, in short, there is nothing wrong with the design of the 2WD Kluger SPECIFICALLY. It is an inherent fault of a niche market (2WD soft-roaders) which have an image which promises more ability than the vehicle itself can deliver.

I bet that a 2WD Hyundai Tuscon (probably the stupidest car of all time) wouldn't be able to make it up the slope either.

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I'm pretty sure that if you have an AWD it will do a better job than FWD. Why didn't they try that with the AWD and then complain if it fails too. B)

I am sure it will do alright. I went up similar hills easily before.

Edited by Taka
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OKK.. finally watched the video. Yes, quite shameful for the FWD Kluger.

A few observations:

- The Kluger was the first to attempt the climb.. Being the first may be have advantage or disdvantage depending on the soil composition. It could be that the upper layer was loose with more compact layer below. The kluger scrapped off the

loose bits so the others could climb easier. :P Ok maybe this doesnt make sense but I m just trying to offer some consolations to the FWD Kluger.

- I believe the Kluger's problem is with its height & weight distribution. The higher centre of gravity tilts the vehicle on an incline.. This lifts up the front of the vehicle and further decreasing front wheels traction. The other FWD vehicles have lower centre of gravity than the Kluger. The Kluger's 2nd attempt at the climb by reversing was successful. Same reason as to why RWD are better than FWD at towing.

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  • 1 month later...

My reply on the You Tube Comment section... Be Fair

Driving is an ART, it is 90% Driver 10% Vehicle, as you can see too much acceleration causes wheel spin, stop on a slope then start again... no momentum... result the 2 tonne toyota is stranded, so what!... Come on Guys... for a fair comparison show us the other vehicles try and do a stop start up hill or at least change the driver in the toyota!

Anyone else think so?

ps... a better driver takes a run up and keeps momentum, goes easy on the accelerator and avoids wheel spin,dont clog the tyres!

I wonder what are all these front wheel drive cars doing there in the first place, they are designed for sealed roads... Car testing?? Really? Wow... since there is an AWD version of the Kluger / Highlander available for a little extra would that make any difference? I feel the Kluger/Highlander is a soft roader, with 200kw Power and 333Nm Tourque with most of it coming on tap from idle it can do 0-100km in 8 seconds flat, but with the wrong driver it cant go up a slippery hill... *LOL* OK

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I wonder what are all these front wheel drive cars doing there in the first place, they are designed for sealed roads... Car testing?? Really? Wow... since there is an AWD version of the Kluger / Highlander available for a little extra would that make any difference? I feel the Kluger/Highlander is a soft roader, with 200kw Power and 333Nm Tourque with most of it coming on tap from idle it can do 0-100km in 8 seconds flat, but with the wrong driver it cant go up a slippery hill... *LOL* OK

Did some research... In China they have a 2.7L VVTI 4 cyclinder as standard... the 3.5 V6 is optional at a price.... arnt we luck here in OZ? :lol:

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