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AUX input mod - PM's sent to DJKOR regarding this mod will go unanswered.


shane_85

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NOTE from DJKOR: Due to the constant stream of questions regarding this modification both on and off the forum, I will no longer be answering any questions about this modification regardless of the question content.

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Hey guys, this is my first post so ill try to make it useful as possible. Ive been trawling through this site for a while getting some ideas and heres the first one that has eventuated.

post-16654-1261125794_thumb.jpg post-16654-1261125900_thumb.jpg

It seems that the factory CD/MP3 player on the aurions (and probably the camry's) have provisions for AUX input and that toyota has been too cheap to bothger utilizing it. All they needed to fork out was a few dollars for some shielded cable, ONE resistor and a headphone jack.

Anyway, down to the point. If you pick up where toyota decided to not leave from, this is what you need to do to get AUX input. (Please refer to the Audio_Visual section of the manual avaliable here).

- Refer to page AV-16 to AV-19. P.S mine is the "Standard Model"

1) Connect F8-19(AUXI) to F6-7(GND) through a 1K resistor, DO NOT GROUND DIRECTLY -> AUX will not work if you do this and the original AUX module DOES have an internal resistor (Thanks DJKOR)

2) Test to see that you now have the AUX option by using either the "Mode" button on the steering wheel or the "Disc" button on the HU. If AUX does not appear, then you have failed with step #1.

3) Using a SHIELDED cable, connect the signal inputs for the AUX as follows:

F8-15(ARI) = Right Channel,

F8-16(ASGN) = Signal Ground / Shield (NOT Chassis ground),

F8-17(ALI) = Left Channel

Have a look here for a 3.5mm headphone jack pinout. (Obviously there is more work if your

going to install a socket rather than a direct lead.)

4) Thats all actuall, enjoy your non FM GAYMITTER tunes. :yahoo:

All the stuff you need can be purchased from jaycar for about $5

The hardest part about completing this mod is finding appropriate connections to put into the F8 plug. Because toyota did not put AUX in there, the above-mentioned connections are blank in the plug and do not have ANY wires or clips in these positions.

Have a look here for pics of my install.

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Hey great stuff... thanks shane. This is basically what I was going to do but you have just made it a whole lot easier for me. I have the 4 disc changer with satnav in mine.... it has the aux input on the back of the my unit. Why toyota release the vehicle without an in car connection to it beats me!!

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looks good mate - very neat!

I have some time off over christmas, might give it a go myself. I've got the sat nav unit, hopefully it's not too different

Its well worth the time and effort to do it i can tell you. You forget all about the convenience and clarity of an AUX input (compared to FM transmitters) when you dont have one.

Anyway, i assume it should be somewhat the same proceedure for you except you will need to refer to this manual for your pinout (Page NS49 & NS50).

It seems as though its the same deal from what i can see, except the pins have different names. The other prob you may run into is that it seems that the AUX has its own plug on the back of your unit so rather than exclude just wires you may be minus an entire plug?? Perseverance and creativity will make short work of that tho :)

No harm in having a look i suppose, i was really surprised at how easily the HU came out actually.

So im ASSUMING (i know its bad to assume but it paid off for me!) from the manual you will be looking at

F14-6(ADPG) to F9-20(GND) - enable the AUX ....through 1K resistor that is

F14-2(VAR+) - Right Signal,

F14-3(VAL+) - Left Signal &

F14-5(VA-) - Signal Ground/Shield

Best of luck and let me know how you go :)

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Hey great stuff... thanks shane. This is basically what I was going to do but you have just made it a whole lot easier for me. I have the 4 disc changer with satnav in mine.... it has the aux input on the back of the my unit. Why toyota release the vehicle without an in car connection to it beats me!!

beats me too, i was not exaggerating when i said it cost me round $5 for the bits (well actually bout $30 with a few extras for the toolbox ;)) but i guess they have thier reasons?? I test drove a couple of camry's and i swear i saw AUX in at least one of them...

I guess we will just have to put it down as an "oversight" as they were concentrating on building an otherwise brilliant car :) (would have been better with AUX tho...)

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Fantastic!!!

Please sticky this topic!!

Yes this is a useful guide, however due to the amount of people I would predict that would actually follow through with it, I don't think it is necessary to add it to the pinned section. Instead, I'll add it to the FAQ later and I'll try and get the pinned section cleaned up as per this suggestion:

Suggestion: Pinned section

I'll also tidy up the FAQ so that it lists the questions at the top which the FAQ covers so it makes it easier to tell if it answers a newbies question.

I PM'ed a mod a few weeks back but they weren't able to do this at the time. I will PM another mod and sort out the FAQ later after I finish removing this palm tree outside.

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Thanks for the post!

Just a quick query though:

3) Using a SHIELDED cable, connect the signal inputs for the AUX as follows:

F8-15(ARI) = Right Channel,

F8-16(ASGN) = Signal Ground / Shield (NOT Chassis ground),

F8-17(ALI) = Left Channel

Have a look here for a 3.5mm headphone jack pinout. (Obviously there is more work if your

going to install a socket rather than a direct lead.)

So basically in the simplest of terms, those three cables will go to your iPod, etc. am I correct? But you just put those three cables into a socket right? Looking at your pictures, did you run the three wires into a plug, and then was the other end of the plug connected to your socket?

Thanks

Edit: Here's a diagram of what I meant, excuse the poor art skills

step3i.jpg

Edited by TheMirror
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TheMirror: Basically, the idea shown in your diagram is correct. The connection to the head unit side goes directly into the socket that connects to the head unit itself, which would be this one:

DSC00472.jpg

Then he has run it direct to a 3.5mm stereo socket mounted in the tray in front of the centre console box. He has just added a connector there for ease of installation/removal like this:

DSC00474.jpg

DSC00476.jpg

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Thanks for clearing that up!

Now I plan to take out the headunit/centre console only once for this job, so if you/someone else could answer a few more questions:

1.) I believe this is the socket used?

2. I can't seem to find the following items, can someone please give me links (preferrably from Jaycar) for:

- The shielded cable

- The cable used in step 1

- Plug(s) used

- The resistor used (there are so many!)

3.) Am I right to assume that I don't need to split any existing cables?

Thanks alot

Edited by TheMirror
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1.) I believe this is the socket used?

That is correct. Well maybe not the exact same one, but that will work.

2. I can't seem to find the following items, can someone please give me links (preferrably from Jaycar) for:

- The shielded cable

If you go to Jaycar, you can get some of this:

FIG 8 - OFC Shielded Audio Cable

- The cable used in step 1

Cable used in step 1? I'd just wire the resistor directly to the plug.

- Plug(s) used

For your purpose, just use something like this:

3 Pin MULTI Pin Plug / Socket

As for the pins to go into the socket that connect to the head unit, I'm not sure of which size is needed so the OP will need to comment on that.

- The resistor used (there are so many!)

A basic carbon/metal film 1/4 to 1/2 watt resistor will do the trick. Such as this one:

1K0ohm 1/2 Watt 1% Metal Film Resistors - Pk.8

3.) Am I right to assume that I don't need to split any existing cables?

That is correct. There is no existing cables and you only add them.

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Guys,

You can buy a kit very similer to this from Toyota now, it was designed to work for the LC200 Sahara model as it's Satnav system doesnt have a direct ipod Aux input like the rest of the 200 series range go figure, anyway it is very similer to the unit in the updated presara as it two had the same problem with having no aux input so you can buy this kit and fit it in your Aurion no probs :)

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You can buy a kit very similer to this from Toyota now, it was designed to work for the LC200 Sahara model as it's Satnav system doesnt have a direct ipod Aux input like the rest of the 200 series range go figure, anyway it is very similer to the unit in the updated presara as it two had the same problem with having no aux input so you can buy this kit and fit it in your Aurion no probs :)

This is true, but those that know what they are doing can save quite a bit of money I would imagine.

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The resistor is there to make the head unit recognise there is an auxiliary source there. If you have a look at the first post again, you will actually see that it answers your question:

1) Connect F8-19(AUXI) to F6-7(GND) through a 1K resistor, DO NOT GROUND DIRECTLY. While this is probably ok, i wouldn't recommend it.

2) Test to see that you now have the AUX option by using either the "Mode" button on the steering wheel or the "Disc" button on the HU. If AUX does not appear, then you have failed with step #1.

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The resistor is there to make the head unit recognise there is an auxiliary source there. If you have a look at the first post again, you will actually see that it answers your question:

1) Connect F8-19(AUXI) to F6-7(GND) through a 1K resistor, DO NOT GROUND DIRECTLY. While this is probably ok, i wouldn't recommend it.

2) Test to see that you now have the AUX option by using either the "Mode" button on the steering wheel or the "Disc" button on the HU. If AUX does not appear, then you have failed with step #1.

It was this comment that provoked my question rather than answered it.

The specification referred too expects to see a voltage of below 1V to recognize it as "low".

Assuming the pull up resistor in the unit is a 1k2, the 1k resistor put the voltage at the pin way above 1V. If my assumptions are correct this means that the 1k resistor might work in some conditions/cars and not others depending on the tolerance stack up. You will also not have enough current for the connector to be reliable in the long term from what I can see of the connector system. I couldn’t see if the terminal was gold plated (required for very low currents).

I asked the question because I am interested to either learn something new or raise a fault finding pointer if it doesn't work. Without seeing the HU internal circuit I don't think I would want to say don't fit a resistor...!

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The resistor is there to make the head unit recognise there is an auxiliary source there. If you have a look at the first post again, you will actually see that it answers your question:

1) Connect F8-19(AUXI) to F6-7(GND) through a 1K resistor, DO NOT GROUND DIRECTLY. While this is probably ok, i wouldn't recommend it.

2) Test to see that you now have the AUX option by using either the "Mode" button on the steering wheel or the "Disc" button on the HU. If AUX does not appear, then you have failed with step #1.

It was this comment that provoked my question rather than answered it.

The specification referred too expects to see a voltage of below 1V to recognize it as "low".

Assuming the pull up resistor in the unit is a 1k2, the 1k resistor put the voltage at the pin way above 1V. If my assumptions are correct this means that the 1k resistor might work in some conditions/cars and not others depending on the tolerance stack up. You will also not have enough current for the connector to be reliable in the long term from what I can see of the connector system. I couldn’t see if the terminal was gold plated (required for very low currents).

I asked the question because I am interested to either learn something new or raise a fault finding pointer if it doesn't work. Without seeing the HU internal circuit I don't think I would want to say don't fit a resistor...!

Hey guys, glad to see my post has been useful! :D

So to get to my point as to why i said to put the resistor on there.... Simply put, this is obviously not a toyota endorsed modification, and who knows what the factory harness has in it, it may just be a wire as you say(maybe somebody could clarify this?). I felt that it would better to be safe than sorry when i was doing the mod myself, and after doing the mod it worked with absolutely no worries at all, and best of all, NO SMOKE. That said, what happens when you short it out directly?? i dont know and i dont intend on finding out...may be fine may not be.

So to summarize, i said to add the resistor because im unsure if it will cause any damage without it, and i would feel HORRIBLE if i were to say "yeh it will be fine to not add the resistor" and then for you guys following this mod to see smoke and dollar signs for a new HU. Ive just posted what i did for you guys EXACTLY as i did it because i know that it works :) I have done about 800km of driving the last few days and had no probs at all with the AUX which has been awesome.

Just a semi-technical aside as to why i used the resistor in the first place. Feel free to correct me, draw ur own conclusions etc etc but this was my train of thought for what its worth.

Having spent many years at uni making circuits, PCB's, dealing with Microcontrollers etc you tend to get into a few habits to cover yourself. One of these habits that I got into (not saying its how things SHOULD be done) was never tying an IO line directly to ground. Now there were a couple of reasons for me to do this (and bad experiences was among them). I wont bore you with the detail but basically an IC trying to drive an IO high when it is directly grounded = bad. But the line on the head unit is an input right? correct, but my habits have prevailed!! On the same token though, it is good practice to tie unused IO lines to ground (or VCC depending on application) to try to reduce power consumption, i always did this through a resistor as a lot of the circuitry was experimental and under development.

That said, another habit you get into is to NOT going around shorting things out when you dont know what exactly you are doing (i DONT have internal schematics for the HU)... If you have to g around shorting things out, at least give the circuitry a chance to tell you something is wrong before the smoke comes out (you cant put the smoke back in !!!) . This is where the resistor came into it, as for size, educated guess.

If anyone is willing to try without the resistor im sure we ALL would love to hear if you do need to go to the effort of putting it in there or not :)

Thanks guys,

Shane

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Hi Shane,

Thanks for the honest informative answer. I guessed this was why you suggested the resistor and I also wasn’t brave enough to say remove it. I did wonder if Toyota had specified a resistor to help with diagnostics.

Have spent more than a decade or so designing vehicle electrical/electronic systems for car manufacturers , I have seen quite a few problems with resistances in grounds and tolerance stack ups. I suppose the general advice is that if you are not feeling brave try the 1k, if this doesn’t work try reducing the value until it does. The worst case will be with a cold alternator, fully charged battery, minimal electrical load and a cold environment.

Regards

Neil

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If anyone is willing to try without the resistor im sure we ALL would love to hear if you do need to go to the effort of putting it in there or not :)

Okay, in the interests of answering this question and satisfying my own curiosity, I took my head unit out of storage and set it up to do a few tests, willing to accept any damages that may occur.

Hey Shane, I completely see where you are coming from with respect to your experience, knowledge and habits. Microcontrollers weren't really my strong point with electronics so it's good to have someone here that knows what they are talking about.

The only thing I saw interesting with the design of the Auxiliary module is that there is no connection to the body ground in it. All basically it connects to the harness/head unit with just 4 cables as specified in your first post:

img1151g.jpg

inputx.jpg

This would lead me to make the assumption that 'AUXI' grounds directly to the signal ground. This in fact is correct as per my tests below. This essentially makes it easier for everything to be connected internally and more importantly, means that the AUX mode will only be enabled when the external source is plugged in for that added convenience. What I didn't expect is that the Auxiliary module actually does have a resistor in it between 'AUXI' and 'ASGN'. This would have to be the case because it wouldn't work otherwise.

Setting up my head unit, I first tried grounding AUXI to the body ground through a 1k resistor. As to be expected, the AUX mode could be selected. Then I changed to a 2k resistor keeping the same ground point and found that the AUX mode could still be selected. I then repeated these tests with the same resistors but grounding through the signal ground instead. The same outcome was achieved.

After this, I then tested by grounding AUXI to the body ground directly. When this was done, the AUX mode could not be selected. I also tried grounding AUXI to the signal ground instead but still could not select the AUX mode. After then changing back to the body ground and leaving it connected for a few minutes, I then put the resistor back in and it was then able to change modes. So essentially I have just confirmed that my head unit was not damaged by not putting a resistor in. I would imagine that due to production line manufacturing that each head unit should be the same meaning that if you accidentally short AUXI to ground or put in too low of a resistor value, no damage should occur. This is just an assumption though, but to be completely safe... make sure you put a resistor in and don't connect direct to ground just to be on the safe side.

So there... the resistor is definitely needed.

I suppose the general advice is that if you are not feeling brave try the 1k, if this doesn’t work try reducing the value until it does. The worst case will be with a cold alternator, fully charged battery, minimal electrical load and a cold environment.

Hey Neil. I'm not sure if this would be a correct assumption, but considering that I managed to get mine to switch to AUX mode using a 2k resistor between ground with the input voltage at 13.89 volts, I would imagine that a 1k resistor should be fine most cases?

AUX mode success:

dsc05527l.jpg

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DJKOR thanks for doing the test work, it is good to understand what works and what doesn’t. Out of interest what was the resistor value in the AUX module?

Good question. I don't have one in my hands to pull apart. All I can say is that there is definitely a resistor in there.

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DJKOR thanks for doing the test work, it is good to understand what works and what doesn’t.

Ditto here, good work DJKOR :) You do raise an interesting point about connecting to the shielded ground instead of chassis ground. The thought didnt even cross my mind that it should be connected to shielded ground, once again i ASSUMED that the shield is for shielding purposes only - end of story.

I didnt look quite as deep as you did though with the schematic you dug up. The part of the manual i referred to used the chassis ground as the reference for testing the AUXI terminal and i assumed thats what it should be connected to. I guess in essence the chassis and signal ground must be connected somewhere and a chassis ground is much easier to find than the shielded ground for testing purposes.

This does raise an interesting point about how you mentioned about not being able to select AUX if nothing is connected to it. As you say, obviously they use the signal ground in the jack so it would be relatively simple for somebody to incorporate this into the mod if they wanted this additional functionality :)

Good work mate, pitty ive already said i guessed/assumed with the resistor cuz i could have said i was "replicating what the genuine AUX has" :P

-Shane

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